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Anatomy of Hip

The hip joint is the largest weight-bearing joint in the human body. It is also referred to as a ball and socket joint and is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The thigh bone or femur and the pelvis join to form the hip joint.
Any injury or disease of the hip will adversely affect the joint's range of motion and ability to bear weight.

The hip joint is made up of the following:

  • Bones and joints
  • Ligaments of the joint capsule
  • Muscles and tendons
  • Nerves and blood vessels that supply the bones and muscles of the hip

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Hip Conditions

  • Avulsion Fractures of the Pelvis Avulsion Fractures of the Pelvis

    Avulsion fractures of the pelvis is an injury that occurs when a tendon or ligament pulls off a piece of bone from the hip. This results in a part of the pelvic (hip) bone breaking away from the main part of the bone.

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  • Developmental Dysplasia Developmental Dysplasia

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) or hip dysplasia is a condition that is seen in infants and young children because of developmental problems in the hip joint. The femur (thighbone) partially or completely slips out of the hip socket leading to dislocation at the hip joint. It is most common in the first-born baby with a family history of the disorder.

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  • Femur Fracture Femur Fracture

    Femur Fracture of the hip (DDH) or hip dysplasia is a condition that is seen in infants and young children because of developmental problems in the hip joint. The femur (thighbone) partially or completely slips out of the hip socket leading to dislocation at the hip joint. It is most common in the first-born baby with a family history of the disorder.

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  • Gluteus Medius Tear Gluteus Medius Tear

    The gluteus medius is one of the major muscles of the hip; essential for the movement of the lower body and keeping the pelvis level during ambulation. The gluteus medius muscle arises from the top of the pelvic bone and attaches to the outer side of the thighbone or femur at the greater trochanter by the gluteus medius tendon. The muscle functions as a hip abductor, controlling side-to-side movement of the hip and providing stabilization to the joint.

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  • Gluteus Tendon Tear Gluteus Tendon Tear

    The gluteal muscles (situated in the buttocks) are necessary for the stability and movement of the hip joints. The tendons of two gluteal muscles (gluteus medius and gluteal minimus) are attached at the outer hip region and are often called the “rotator cuff of the hip.” These tendons may be subject to injury or tearing due to various reasons. Since these gluteal muscles are involved in abduction (movement of your leg away from the midline of the body), the tears are also called abductor tendon tears.

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  • Hamstring Injuries Hamstring Injuries

    The hamstring is a group of three muscles that run along the back of the thigh from the hip to the knee. Hamstring injuries occur when these muscles are strained or pulled. They are common in dancers and athletes of all sorts including runners and those who play football, soccer, basketball, tennis, etc.

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  • Hip Bursitis Hip Bursitis

    Hip bursitis is a painful condition caused by the inflammation of a bursa in the hip. Bursae are fluid-filled sacs present in the joints between bone and soft tissue to reduce friction and provide cushioning during movement.

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  • Hip Dislocation Hip Dislocation

    The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur or thighbone, and the “socket” is the cup-shaped acetabulum. The joint is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons that support and hold the bones of the joint in place. Hip dislocation occurs when the head of the femur moves out of the socket. The femoral head can dislocate either backward (posterior dislocation) or forward (anterior dislocation).

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  • Hip Flexor Strain Hip Flexor Strain

    A hip flexor strain is an overuse injury to the flexor muscles of your hip and can range from a minor stretch injury to a complete tear of the muscle fibers or tendons.

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  • Hip Fracture Hip Fracture

    The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur or thighbone, and the “socket” is the cup-shaped acetabulum. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain-free movement in the joint.

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  • Hip Instability Hip Instability

    The hip plays an important role in supporting your upper body weight while standing, walking and running, and hip stability is crucial for these functions. The femur (thighbone) and acetabulum (socket-shaped region of the pelvis) join to form the hip joint, while the labrum (rim of tissue that seals the hip joint) and the ligaments lining the hip capsule maintain the stability of the hip.

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  • Hip Osteonecrosis Hip Osteonecrosis

    Hip osteonecrosis occurs due to disruption of the blood supply to the highest part of the thigh bone (femoral head). Due to lack of nourishment, the bone tissue of the femoral head dies and gradually collapses, which may further lead to degeneration of the underlying cartilage.

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  • Hip Pain Hip Pain

    Hip pain, one of the common complaints, may not always be felt precisely over the hip joint rather in and around the hip joint. The cause for pain is multifactorial and the exact position of your hip pain suggests the probable cause or underlying condition causing it.

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  • Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip

    The inflammation of the joints is referred to as arthritis. Inflammation arises when the smooth lining called cartilage at the ends of bones wears away. In some cases, the inflammation is caused when the lining of the joint becomes inflamed as part of an underlying systemic disease. These conditions are referred to as inflammatory arthritis.

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  • Osteoarthritis of the Hip Osteoarthritis of the Hip

    Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in the elderly. This disease affects the tissue covering the ends of bones in a joint called cartilage. In osteoarthritis, the cartilage becomes damaged and worn out, causing pain, swelling, stiffness and restricted movement in the affected joint. Although osteoarthritis may affect various joints including the hips, knees, hands, and spine, the hip joint is most commonly affected. Rarely, the disease may affect the shoulders, wrists, and feet.

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  • Pediatric Femur Fracture Pediatric Femur Fracture

    The femur or thighbone is the largest and strongest bone in the human body. Pediatric thighbone fractures can occur when your child falls hard on the ground and gets hit during sports, automobile accidents and child abuse. In a thighbone fracture, the broken bones may be aligned or displaced. The fracture can either be closed (with skin intact) or open (with the bone piercing out through the skin). Your child may experience severe pain, swelling, inability to stand and walk, and limited range-of-motion of the hip or knee.

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  • Pelvic Fractures Pelvic Fractures

    A pelvic fracture is a condition that occurs due to the breakage of the pelvic bone. It may cause damage to the internal organs, nerves and blood vessels associated with the pelvic region.

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  • Periprosthetic Hip Fractures Periprosthetic Hip Fractures

    Hip replacement is a surgical procedure in which the damaged cartilage and bone are removed from the hip joint and replaced with artificial components. Any resulting fractures or breaks in the bone around the implant are called periprosthetic hip fractures. They usually occur around the stem of the implant and sometimes to the socket (acetabulum).

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  • Snapping Hip Syndrome Snapping Hip Syndrome

    Snapping hip syndrome is a condition in which you hear or feel a snapping sound in the hip when you swing your legs, run, walk or get up from a chair. The sound can be experienced in the back, front or side of the hip.

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  • Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is a rare condition that causes temporary bone loss in the upper region of the thighbone (femur). It occurs most often in young or middle-aged men of the age groups 30 to 60, and women in their later stages of pregnancy or early postpartum (following childbirth). It is characterized by abrupt onset of pain that increases with activity.

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Hip Procedures

  • Activities After Hip Replacement Activities After Hip Replacement

    Hip replacement is a surgery performed to replace parts of a diseased hip joint with a prosthesis. The goal of hip replacement is to eliminate pain and enable you to return to your normal activities. You can help in the recovery and improve the outcomes of the procedure by following certain precautions and changing the way you carry out your daily activities.

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  • Hip Fracture ORIF Hip Fracture ORIF

    A hip fracture is a break that occurs near the hip in the upper part of the femur or thighbone. The thighbone has two bony processes on the upper part - the greater and lesser trochanters. The lesser trochanter projects from the base of the femoral neck on the back of the thighbone. Hip fractures can occur either due to a break in the femoral neck, in the area between the greater and lesser trochanter or below the lesser trochanter.

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  • Hip Fracture Surgery Hip Fracture Surgery

    Hip fractures involve a break that occurs near the hip in the upper part of the femur or thigh bone. The thigh bone has two bony processes on the upper part - the greater and lesser trochanters. The lesser trochanter projects from the base of the femoral neck on the back of the thigh bone. Hip fractures can occur either due to a break in the femoral neck, in the area between the greater and lesser trochanter or below the lesser trochanter.

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  • Hip Labral Tear Hip Labral Tear

    The hip joint is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur is the ball and the acetabulum forms the socket. The labrum helps to deepen the socket and provide stability to the joint. It also acts as a cushion and enables smooth movement of the joint.

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  • Hip Resurfacing Hip Resurfacing

    The hip joint is also known as a ball and socket joint, where the ball (femoral head) of the thigh bone fits into the socket (acetabulum) of the pelvic bone.

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  • Minimally Invasive Total Hip Replacement Minimally Invasive Total Hip Replacement

    Minimally invasive total hip replacement is a surgical procedure performed through one or two small incisions rather than the single long incision of 10–12-inches as in the traditional approach.

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  • Revision Hip Replacement Revision Hip Replacement

    During total hip replacement, the damaged cartilage and bone are removed from the hip joint and replaced with artificial components. At times, hip replacement implants can wear out for various reasons and may need to be replaced with the help of a surgical procedure known as revision hip replacement surgery.

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  • Total Hip Replacement Total Hip Replacement

    Total hip replacement is a surgical procedure in which the damaged cartilage and bone are removed from the hip joint and replaced with artificial components. The main indication for total hip replacement isarthritis.

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  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • Medical University of South Carolina
  • Athe American College of Surgeons
  • American Shoulder And Elbow Surgeons